Silver or Lead

I started watching Narcos this year after hearing so much about it during the last year, and I just admit that it is probably the best show I have ever watched. The fact that the whole show was filmed in the city where the events happened not even 30 years ago makes this show different. Even though Pablo Escobar is considered as one of the most dangerous people to have ever live, we get to know him also as a dad and as a friend. Even though that during the show Escobar is responsible of so many deaths and he is even considered a terrorist in his country, a part of me really admires me. I know this is wrong, it goes against everything I believe in. Escobar was a horrible person, killed thousands of people and was a drug dealer. Nevertheless, ever since I stopped watching the show I’ve done a lot of research about his family and his hitman. In an interview to his son, who was extradited next to his mom and sister out of Colombia after the death of his father, he talks about how Escobar was such a good father and how much he cared about his family. Escobar’s soon talks about his dad so positively and explains the ways in which his dad would always be loving with his sister and himself and how much he loved his wife. In another interview to one of Escobar’s most dangerous hitman’s, the man who has just left prison talks about Escobar as a sort of God. He explains how they only worked for him because making him smile would be enough for them to kill as many people as needed. This is why it is so hard for me to understand how his figure was created and how he became so powerful. He was 5’6 man who had a sweet voice and that made the poor happy, but on the other hand he was a giant of drug dealing and killing people. It is crazy for me the ways in with the show Narcos is able to portray him as a hero even though he was such a horrible person. If you haven’t watch the show yet I really recommend you to! – Jon Baqueropablo_escobar2.jpg

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4 Responses to Silver or Lead

  1. mediaphiles says:

    I think it is awesome that a television show prompted you to go out and actually research this Escobar’s real life. I think also that it is an interesting fact that you found so many sources and interviews that portray him as a good man from the people he was close with. I was originally going to respond to this post saying that I think any good television show can portray a character as likable or hated depending on the decisions made on how to portray them on the show, but the facts you presented have somewhat refuted that argument. Of course, I think that is still a quality of good television writing to be able to make a seemingly unlikeable character likable, but I’m not sure that I can say it is the only reason as to why you find him enthralling. The information you present makes me think of Hitler and the Nazi party. Everyone that followed him loved him and thought he was doing the right thing. I wonder if Escobar had the same effect. I think it’s interesting, too, that television would create a show with a likable Escobar – I wonder what the real message is in portraying this.
    -Nicolette McCann

  2. mediaphiles says:

    I also absolutely loved Narcos. It is incredible the way the show made you hate yet also greatly empathize with Pablo Escobar. An incredible show that I recommend to anyone who hasn’t seen it.
    Stephanie Rubin

  3. mediaphiles says:

    I think what you describe is what every good biopic does. You can feel empathy and gain an understanding of a person as more than just what actions they committed. I watched a few episodes of Narcos and liked it, but I never finished it. To me, it helped that Wagner Moura was such an amazing actor. If someone else had taken the role, who knows if he would be as sympathetic. Bryan Cranston (who was/is strongly for Hillary and against Trump) said he would star in a biopic about Donald Trump. With an actor as good as Cranston (provided the writing is there), maybe even Trump could become sympathetic. Maybe. Though doubtful. – Max Dosser

  4. mediaphiles says:

    I don’t know if you happened to read my post about Narcos from a few weeks back, but I wrote about Wagner Moura (Brazilian) and his portrayal of Escobar (Colombian). I love this show and really enjoyed watching it, but I’ve read and heard a lot of complaints from native Colombians who were offended by Moura’s casting and his inability to authentically pull off a Colombian accent. This may be hard to conceptualize if you’re a native English speaker and are unable to pick up on the differences, but for some people the implications are significant. Just some food for thought!

    -Callie Sartain

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